Weekly Study Skills For Reading

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Third Grade Weekly Study Skills
Unit 1, Week 1, “When Charlie McButton Lost Power” 
September 27th- September 7th 


When Charlie McButton Lost Power
by Suzanne Collins
illustrated by Mike Lester




A Narrative Poem about a boy who loses power and his tech empire comes crumbling down. What will Charlie do without his computer games and batteries?
Question of the week: What can we learn from trying new things?

Genre: Narrative Poem is poetry that has plot, rhythm, and rhyme.

Literary Elements of the week:
  1. Plot- beginning, middle, end
  2. Character- who is the story about
  3. Setting- when and where does the story take place
  4. Theme- what is the message in the story, what do we learn from the story
Tested Vocabulary
  • bat- a small animal
  • battery- connected electric cells that produce a direct current
  • blew-formed something by expelling air
  • fuel-something burned for heat
  • plug- a connection on the end of corded electrical devise that is put into the wall to carry electricity
  • vision- the ability to come up with new ideas
  • term- a length of time

Spelling- VC/VC Pattern
  1. lettuce
  2. happen
  3. basket
  4. winter
  5. sister
  6. problem
  7. supper
  8. subject
  9. lesson
  10. spelling
  11. napkin
  12. collar
  13. traffic
  14. suggest
  15. puppet
  16. skillet
  17. picnic
  18. planet
  19. system
  20. pumpkin



Third Grade Weekly Study Skills
Unit 1, Week 2, “What About Me?”
September 10th- September 14th


What About Me?
by Ed Young


Fable is a story that teaches a lesson, or moral. What moral does this story teach? This story is about a boy who must trade goods to obtain knowledge.


Question of the week: What can we learn by trading with one another?

Genre: Fable is a story that teaches a lesson, or moral.

Comprehension Skill and Strategy of the week:
  1. Sequence- the order in which things happen in a story. Examples of time order words: First, next, then, last.
  2. Summarize- a short statement that tells the goals of the characters, how they tried to reach them, and whether they succeeded in the end.




Tested Vocabulary
  • carpenter - someone who builds with wood
  • knowledge - having information, facts, and ideas
  • carpetmakera rug weaver
  • marketplace- a place where people buy and sell
  • merchant- someone who buys and sells goods
  • plenty- more than enough
  • straying- wandering away
  • thread- a fine twisted cord
Spelling- Plurals -s,-es, -ies
  1. pennies
  2. inches
  3. plants
  4. families
  5. bodies
  6. glasses
  7. wishes
  8. pockets
  9. lists
  10. copies
  11. parties
  12. bunches
  13. crashes
  14. supplies
  15. pencils
Challenge Words
accidents
libraries
mysteries
carpenters
merchants




Third Grade Weekly Study Skills
Unit 1, Week 3, “Kumak’s Fish”
September 17th- September 21th


Kumak's Fish
written and illustrated by Michael Bania


Tall Tale is a story that uses exaggeration. This is a story about a family that went fishing? What exaggeration is in this story?
Question of the week: How can we achieve goals?

Genre: Tall Tale is a story about a larger-than-life character, either fictional or based on a real person who has exaggerated adventures and performs exaggerated feats of daring, strength, courage, and/or intelligence.

Comprehension Skill and Strategy of the week:
  1. Sequence- the order in which things happen in a story. Examples of time order words: First, next, then, last.
  2. Comprehension




Tested Vocabulary
  • gear- equipment needed for some purpose
  • parka - a jacket with a hood
  • splendidmagnificent or grand
  • twitch- to move with a quick jerk
  • willow- a tree with tough slender branches
  • yanked- pulled or jerked
Spelling- Base Words and Endings -ed,-ing, -ier, 
-est
  1. using
  2. getting
  3. easiest
  4. swimming
  5. heavier
  6. greatest
  7. pleased
  8. emptied
  9. leaving
  10. worried
  11. strangest
  12. freezing
  13. funniest
  14. angrier
  15. shopped
Challenge Words
included
occurred
supplying
scarier
happiest





 
Supermarket
Author: Kathleen Krull
Illustrator: Melonie Hope Greenberg
Unit 1 Week 4

Expository text describes real things and places. Look for interesting facts and details about supermarkets as you read.


Question of the week:
How can we get what we want and need?

Genre:
Expository text describes real things and places.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Compare and Contrast
Strategy: Background Knowledge
Trait: Voice
Writing Mini-Lesson: Description
Conventions: Imperative and Exclamatory Sentences



Vocabulary:
Thousands: ten hundred.
Shelves: horizontal boards on a wall or in a cupboard used for holding or storing things.
Laundry: clothes, towels, and other such items that need to be washed or have just been washed.
Traded: exchanged one thing for another.
Section: a part or division of something.
Store: a place where things are sold.
Variety: a selection of different things.
Spoiled: became bad or not good to eat.



Spelling Words (Vowel Digraphs ee, ea; ai, ay; oa, ow):
1.     clean
2.     cheese
3.     grain
4.     float
5.     shadow
6.     dream
7.     Sunday
8.     window
9.     teeth
10. braid
11. display
12. agree
13. peach
14. coach
15. thrown

Challenge words:   entertain
16. complain
17. willow
18. wheat
19. bleachers


My Rows and Piles of Coins
By: Toloowa M. Mollel
Illustrated by E. B. Lewis
Unit 1 Week 5

Realistic fiction is a story that could really happen. Has anything like this ever happened to you?


Question of the week:
What do we need to know about saving and spending?

Genre:
Realistic Fiction is a story that could really happen

Literary Elements:
Skill: Author’s Purpose
Strategy: Story Structure
Trait: Sentences
Writing Mini-Lesson: Writing for Tests: Realistic Fiction
Conventions: Compound Sentences

Vocabulary:
Errands: short trips that you take to do something
Steady: firmly fixed, firm, not swaying or shaking.
Dangerously: not safely
Unwrapped: opened.
Bundles: numbers of things tied or wrapped together.
Wobbled: moved unsteadily from side to side, shook, trembled.
Arranged: have put things in a certain order.
Excitedly: with strong, lively feelings.


Spelling Words (Vowel Diphthongs /ou/ spelled ou,ow; /oi/ spelled oi, oy):
1.     proud
2.     employ
3.     voyage
4.     appoint
5.     prowl
6.     amount
7.     annoy
8.     thousand
9.     hour
10. poison
11. avoid
12. shower
13. bounce
14. choice
15. broil

Challenge words:
1.     however
2.     turmoil
3.     coward
4.     mountain
5.     chowder

Penguin Chick
By: Betty Tatham
Illustrated by: Helen K. Davie
Unit 2 Week 1
 

Expository text gives information about things in the real world, such as emperor penguins. What facts do you want to learn about these penguins and chicks?



Question of the week:
How do structures of plants and animals help them solve problems?

Genre:
Expository text gives information about things in the real world, such as emperor penguins.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Main idea and Details
Strategy: Monitor and Clarify
Trait: Word Choice
Writing mini-lesson: Poetry: Cinquains, Diamantes
Conventions: Common and Proper Nouns
Vocabulary:
Hatch: come out of an egg
Preen: to smooth or arrange feather with the beak.
Cuddles: lies close and comfortably, curls up.
Pecks: strikes with the beak
Flippers: the broad, flat parts used for swimming by animals such as seals and penguins.
Snuggles: lies closely and comfortably together, nestles, cuddles.
Frozen: hardened with cold, turned to ice.



Spelling (V/CV, VC/V pattern):
1.     finish
2.     pupil
3.     music
4.     camel
5.     lemon
6.     wagon
7.     tulip
8.     female
9.     even
10. robot
11. rapid
12. pilot
13. focus
14. silent
15. salad

Challenge Words:
1.     resident
2.     spinach
3.     tradition
4.     innocent
5.     climate
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I Wanna Iguana
By: Karne Kaufman Orloff
Illustrated by: David Catrow
Unit 2 Week 2

Realistic Fiction tells a made-up story that could really happen. Read this story to find out if Alex can persuade his mom to let him have and iguana.


Question of the week:
How do you know if a solution is a good solution?

Genre: Realistic Fiction tells a made-up story that coud really happen.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Compare and Contrast
Strategy: Visualize
Trait: Word Choice
Writing Mini-Lesson: Writing for tests: Fairy Tale
Conventions: Singular and plural nouns




Vocabulary:
Adorable: attractive and delightful.
Exactly: without any error, or precisely.
Mature: mentally or physically like and adult.
Trophies: awards, often in the form of statues or cups, given as prizes in races or contests.
Compassionate: wishing to help those who suffer.
Iguana: large lizard found in tropical America that has a row of spines along its back.
Mention: tell or speak about something.

Spelling Words (final Syllable –le)
1.     handle
2.     pickle
3.     middle
4.     uncle
5.     poodle
6.     people
7.     juggle
8.     gentle
9.     simple
10. saddle
11. little
12. trouble
13. noodle
14. table
15. riddle

Challenge Words:
1.     example
2.     throttle
3.     miracle
4.     muscle
5.     obstacle


 
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Prudy’s Problem and How She Solved It.
By: Carey Armstrong-Ellis
Unit 2 Week 3

A Fantasy includes make-believe events. Look for situations that could not happen.


Question of the Week:
When is it time to find a solution?

Genre: Fantasy includes make-belive events. Look for situations that could not happen.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Draw Conclusions
Strategy: Questioning
Trait: Focus/Ideas
Writing mini-lesson: Advertisement
Conventions: Irregular Plural Nouns


Vocabulary:
Enormous: very, very large or huge.
Strain: draw too tight, stretch too much.
Collection: a group of things gathered from many places and belonging together.
Scattered: separated and went in different directions.
Shoelaces: strings or cords used for fastening shoes.
Butterflies: insects with large, often brightly colored wings.



Spelling Words (compound words):
1.     sunglasses
2.     haircut
3.     snowstorm
4.     blueberry
5.     campground
6.     football
7.     popcorn
8.     earring
9.     butterflies
10. sandbox
11. homework
12. railroad
13. scarecrow
14. lawnmower
15. toothbrush

Challenge Words:
1.     thumbtack
2.     courthouse
3.     scrapbook
4.     earthquake
5.     whirlpool


 
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Tops and Bottoms
Adapted and Illustrated by Janet Stevens
Unit 2 Week 4

An Animal Fantasy is a story with animal characters that behave like people. Look for ways that Bear and Hare act like people.


Question of the Week:
What can we do to make sure solutions are fair:

Genre: Animal Fantasy is a story with animal characters that behave like people.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Author’s Purpose
Strategy: Predict and Set Purpose
Trait: Focus/Ideas
Writing mini-lesson: Friendly Letter
Conventions: Singular Possessive Nouns


Vocabulary:
Lazy: not willing to work or move fast.
Clever: bright, intelligent, having a quick mind.
Wealth: riches, many valuable possessions, or property.
Bottom: the lowest part.
Cheated: did business or played in a way that is not honest.
Crops: plants grown for food.
Partners: members of a company or firm who share the risk and profits of the business.


Spelling Words (Consonant blends squ, spl, thr, str):
1.     splash
2.     throne
3.     strength
4.     splurge
5.     thrill
6.     square
7.     throw
8.     scratch
9.     squeak
10. split
11. street
12. scream
13. three
14. squeeze
15. strike

Challenge Words:
1.     squid
2.     squander
3.     instrument
4.     strategy
5.     arthritis
 
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Amazing Bird Nests
By: Ron Fridell
Unit 2 Week 5


Expository Text gives facts and information. Look for facts about bird nests as you read.


Question of the Week:
How have plants and animals adapted to solve problems?

Genre: Expository text gives facts and information.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Main Idea and Details
Strategy: Text Structure
Trait: Organization
Writing Mini-Lesson: Directions
Conventions: Plural Possessive Nouns


Vocabulary:
Material: cloth, the substance from which something is made.
Twigs: small, thin branches of trees or other woody plants.
Goo: sticky or messy substance.
Hunters: animals or people who go after animals for food or sport.
Tons: unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds.
Bill: beak of a bird.
Platform: a flat, raised structure or surface.


Spelling Words (Consonant Digraphs):
1.     father
2.     watch
3.     shrink
4.     trophy
5.     fashion
6.     chapter
7.     weather
8.     pitcher
9.     other
10. flash
11. alphabet
12. catch
13. athlete
14. English
15. Nephew

Challenge Words:
1.     northern
2.     establish
3.     hyphen
4.     challenge
5.     emphasis

 
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How Do You Raise a Raisin?
By: Pam Munoz Ryan
Illustrated by: Craig Brown
Unit 3 Week 1

This Expository Text asks questions using rhythm and rhyme. The answers tell all about raisins. What do you want to learn about raisins as you read?


Question of the Week:
How do people and nature interact?

Genre:
Expository Text asks questions using rhythm and rhyme. The answers tell all about raisins.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Draw Conclusions
Strategy: Important Ideas
Trait: Voice
Writing Mini-Lesson: Fiction
Conventions: Actions and Linking Verbs



Vocabulary:
Area: the amount of surface or a level, open space.
Raisin: small, sweet, dried up grape.
Preservative: any substance that will prevent decay or injury.
Artificial: made by a person or machine, not natural.
Proof: a way or means of showing that something is true.
Grapevine: a vine that grapes grow on.
Raise: breed or grow.



Spelling Words (Contracitons):
1.     let’s
2.     they’ll
3.     I’d
4.     wasn’t
5.     she’d
6.     can’t
7.     should’ve
8.     hasn’t
9.     you’ll
10. we’d
11. haven’t
12. he’d
13. when’s
14. won’t
15. didn’t

Challenge Words:
1.     they’d
2.     would’ve
3.     needn’t
4.     you’ve
5.     could’ve

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Pushing Up the Sky
By: Joseph Bruchac
Illustrated by: Teresa Flavin
Unit 3 Week 2


A Drama uses dialogue to present characters and plot. This drama is a myth about how something in nature cam e to be. Read to find out why the characters are pushing up the sky.


Question of the Week:
How do people explain things in nature:

Genre: Drama uses dialogue to present characters and plot.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Literary Elements
Strategy: Inferring
Trait: Organization
Writing Mini-Lesson: Drama: Play
Conventions: Main and Helping Verbs. 



Vocabulary
Overhead: over the head, above.
Narrator: person who narrates, or tells, the story or tale.
Poked: pushed with force against someone or something, jabbed.
Antlers: bony, branching growths on heads of male deer elk, or moose.
Imagined: made a picture or idea of something in your mind.
Languages: different kinds of human speech, spoken or written.




Spelling Words (Prefixes un-, re-, mis-, dis-, non-):
1.     unhappy
2.     disagree
3.     mistake
4.     dishonest
5.     mislead
6.     unload
7.     unknown
8.     replace
9.     disappear
10. unroll
11. dislike
12. recall
13. rewrite
14. misspell
15. react

Challenge Words:
1.     unfortunate
2.     uncomfortable
3.     mispronounce
4.     discourage
5.     recycle

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Seeing Stars
By: Donna Latham
Unit 3 Week 3


Expository Text gives information and facts. Read to find interesting facts and details to help you see stars in a whole new way!


Question of the Week:
What can we learn about nature by investigating?

Genre: Expository Text gives information and facts.

Literary Elements:
Skills: Graphic Sources
Strategy: Text Structure
Trait: Conventions
Writing Mini-Lesson: Formal Letter
Conventions: Subject-Verb Agreement


Vocabulary:
Shine: to give off light or reflect light, glow.
Dim: somewhat dark, not bright.
Ladle: a large spoon with a large handle and a deep bowl.
Gas: a substance, such as air, that is neither a solid or a liquid.
Temperature: the degree of heat or cold in something, usually measured by a thermometer.
Gigantic: huge or enormous.
Patterns: arrangements or designs.


Spelling Words (Spellings of /j/, /s/, /k/):
1.     clock
2.     brake
3.     kitten
4.     badge
5.     pocket
6.     mark
7.     jacket
8.     edge
9.     page
10. ridge
11. crack
12. large
13. change
14. judge
15. orange

Challenge Words:
1.     freckles
2.     advantage
3.     Kentucky
4.     Kingdom
5.     Pledge


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A Symphony of Whales
By: Steve Schuch
Illustrated by: Wendell Minor
Unit 3 Week 4

Fiction sometime tells a story based on events that really did happen. Look for parts you think are true.


Question of the Week:
How can people help animals in danger?

Genre: Fiction sometimes tells a story based on events that really did happen.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Generalize
Strategy: Story Structure
Trait: Sentences
Writing Mini-Lesson: News Article
Conventions: Verb Tenses


Vocabulary:
Surrounded: shut in on all sides, encircled.
Blizzards: blinding snowstorms with very strong, cold winds.
Chipped: cut or broken off a small thin piece of something.
Channel: a body of water joining two larger bodies of water.
Supplies: the food and equipment necessary for an event.
Melody: a tune, or pleasing or easily remembered series of musical notes.
Bay: a part of a sea or lake partly surrounded by land.
Anxiously:  uneasily, with fear of what might happen.
Symphony: a long, complicated musical composition for an orchestra.

 Spelling Words (Suffixes –ly, -ful, -ness, -less, -able, -ible):
1.     beautiful
2.     finally
3.     illness
4.     suddenly
5.     fairness
6.     safely
7.     spotless
8.     helpful
9.     wireless
10. cheerful
11. kindness
12. worthless
13. daily
14. quietly
15. painful

Challenge Words:
1.     anxiously
2.     cautiously
3.     breathless
4.     thoughtfully
5.     tardiness




Around one Cactus
 Owls, Bats, and Leaping Rats
By: Anthony D. Fredericks
Illustrated by: Jennifer DiRubbia
Unit 3 Week 5

Narrative nonfiction tells about real things using elements of stories. As you read, think about how the facts have been arranged.


Question of the week:
What can we observe in different environments?

Genre: Narrative nonfiction tells about real things using elements of stories.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Cause and Effect
Strategy: Predict and Set Purpose
Trait: Word Choice
Writing Mini-Lesson: Writing for Tests: Expository Text.
Conventions: Irregular Verbs.

Vocabulary:
Lofty: very high
Search: to look through, examine, or try to find something by looking for it.
Unseen: not seen, unnoticed.
Incredible: impossible to believe, unbelievable.
Stinging: something that can pierce or wound with a sharp point.
Survivors: people or things that survive.
Noble: excellent, fine, splendid, magnificent.
Topic: a subject that people think, talk, or write about.
Waterless: containing little or no water.

Spelling Words (Consonant Patterns):
1.     thumb
2.     know
3.     wrist
4.     wrench
5.     lamb
6.     gnaw
7.     climb
8.     crumb
9.     knot
10. knob
11. written
12. design
13. assign
14. wrinkle
15. knit

Challenge Words:
1.     wrestler
2.     honeycomb
3.     bologna
4.     knickknack
5.     cologne
The Man Who Invented Basketball
James Naismith and His Amazing Game
By Edwin Brit Wyckoff
Unit 4 Week 1

A Biography is the story of a person’s life, written by another person. As you read think about why someone would write about James Naismith.


Question of the week:
How do talents make someone unique?

Genre:
A Biography is the story of a person’s life, written by another person.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Generalize
Strategy: Summarize
Trait: Focus/Ideas
Writing Mini-Lesson: Persuasive Text
Conventions: Singular and Plural Pronouns.

Vocabulary:
Disease: a sickness or illness.
Terrible: causing great fear, dreadful, awful.
Sports: games or contests that  require some skill and usually a certain amount of physical exercise.
Guard: a member of the backcourt on a basketball team.
Study: make an effort to learn.
Basketball: a game played with a large, round ball between two teams of five players each. The players score points by tossing the ball through baskets hanging at either end of the court.
Freeze: become hard from cold, turn into a solid.
Popular: liked by most people.

Spelling Words (Irregular Plurals):
1.     wolves
2.     mice
3.     children
4.     banjoes
5.     scarves
6.     men
7.     elves
8.     heroes
9.     feet
10. cuffs
11. sheep
12. knives
13. geese
14. women
15. halves

Challenge Words:
1.     loaves
2.     potatoes
3.     tornadoes
4.     tomatoes
5.     beliefs


Hottest, Coldest, Highest, Deepest
 
By Steve Jenkins
Unit 4 Week 2

Expository Text gives information about the real world. Look for numbers and diagrams that help you understand the facts.


Question of the Week:
What makes nature’s record holders unique?

Genre:
Expository Text gives information about the real world.

Literary Elements:
Skill: graphic Sources
Strategy: Important Ideas
Trait: Conventions
Writing Mini-Lesson: Imaginative Story
Conventions: Subject and Object Pronouns

 
Vocabulary:
Outrun: run faster than someone or something else.
Waterfalls: streams of water that fall from high places.
Depth: the distance from the top to the bottom.
Tides: the rise and fall of the ocean about every twelve hours that are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun.
Peak: the pointed top of a mountain or hill.
Erupted: burst out violently.
Deserts: dry, sandy regions without water and trees.
Average: the quantity found by dividing the sum of all the quantities by the number of quantities.


Spelling Words (r- Controlled Vowels):
1.     third
2.     verb
3.     dirty
4.     workout
5.     perfect
6.     certain
7.     thirsty
8.     word
9.     world
10. worm
11. earth
12. early
13. nerve
14. herself
15. earn

Challenge Words:
1.     determine
2.     commercial
3.     worthwhile
4.     virtual
5.     whirlwind
 
Rocks in his Head
By: Carol Otis Hurst
Illustrated by: James Stevenson
Unit 4 Week 3

A Biography is the story of a real person’s life, written by another person. As you read, think about how is this author connected to the person she wrote about.


Question of the week:
Why is it valuable to have unique interests?

Genre:
A Biography is the story of a real person’s life, written by another person.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Fact and Opinion
Strategy: Inferring
Trait: Sentences
Writing Mini-Lesson: Biography
Conventions: Possessive Pronouns


Vocabulary:
Stamps: small pieces of paper with glue on the back.
Attic: the space in a house just below the roof and above the other rooms.
Board: a council or group of people managing something.
Labeled: put or wrote a label on something.
Chores: small tasks or easy jobs that you have to do regularly.
Customers: someone who buys goods or services.
Spare: extra.

Spelling Words (Prefixes pre-, mid-, over-, out-, bi-, de-):
1.     prepaid
2.     midpoint
3.     outline
4.     outside
5.     pretest
6.     outdoors
7.     overdue
8.     Midwest
9.     overflow
10. overtime
11. prefix
12. midnight
13. outgoing
14. overgrown
15. outfield

Challenge Words:
1.     precaution
2.     prediction
3.     overweight
4.     prehistoric
5.     midsection
America’s Champion Swimmer:
 Gertrude Ederle
By: David A. Adler
Illustrated by: Terry Widener
Unit 4 Week 4

A Biography gives facts about a real person’s life. Why do you think the author wrote a biography about Gertrude Ederle?


Question of the week:
What unique traits does it take to be the first to do something?

Genre:
A Biography gives facts about a real person’s life.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Fact and Opinion
Strategy: Questioning
Trait: Organization
Writing Mini-Lesson: Autobiography
Conventions: Contractions


Vocabulary:
Drowned: Died or caused to die under water or other liquid because of lack of air to breathe.
Medals: pieces of metal, like coins, given as a prize or award, usually with a picture or words stamped on them.
Continued: kept up, kept on, went on.
Celebrate: to do something special in honor of a special person, day, or event.
Strokes: complete movements made over and over again.
Current: a flow or stream of water, electricity, air, or any fluid.
Stirred: mixed something by moving it around with a spoon, stick, and so on.

Spelling Words ( Suffixes –er, -or,-ess, -ist):
1.     dentist
2.     organist
3.     actress
4.     investor
5.     tourist
6.     hostess
7.     chemist
8.     tutor
9.     artist
10. shipper
11. seller
12. editor
13. lioness
14. swimmer
15. conductor

Challenge Words:
1.     announcer
2.     pharmacist
3.     commuter
4.     pianist
5.     journalist




Fly, Eagle, Fly!
 An African Tale
Retold By: Christopher Gregorowski
Illustrated by: Niki Daly
Unit 4 Week 5

Folk Tales are stories or legends from other lands and are handed down from one generation to the next. Where is this story from?


Question of the Week:
What behaviors are unique to different animals?

Genre:
Folk Tales are stories or legends from other lands and are handed down from one generation to the next.

Literary Elements:
Skill: Cause and Effect
Strategy: Monitor and Clarify
Trait: Word Choice
Writing Mini-Lesson: Writing for Tests: Summary
Conventions: Prepositions


Vocabulary:
Scrambled: to make your way, especially by climbing or crawling quickly.
Echoed: was heard again.
Reeds: kinds of tall grass that grow in wet places.
Thatch: plant material, such as straw or reeds, that are used to make a cover of a roof.
Gully: a ditch made by heavy rains or running water.
Valley: a region of low land that lies between hills or mountains.
Clutched: grasped something tightly.

 
 
Spelling Words (Syllables VCCCV):
1.     monster
2.     contrast
3.     control
4.     substance
5.     pilgrim
6.     complete
7.     address
8.     inspect
9.     hundred
10. district
11. instant
12. surprise
13. explode
14. sample
15. children

Challenge Words:
1.     merchant
2.     curtsy
3.     embrace
4.     contrast
5.     purchase

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